Author Topic: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?  (Read 10341 times)

Brakelate

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G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« on: August 16, 2012, 09:23:35 PM »
I am sure it is out there somewhere, but I am looking for the "official" standard measurements to lay out the "G8" course, so me and some other newbies can set it up and get base line times for comparison.

Rather than just searching the interweb, can someone post it up here, perhaps with a diagram for future reference for everyone else who may be looking for the same info in the future to get started.

Thanks!

'09 Suzuki DRZ-400SM   '02 Kawasaki ZRX1200R

Emefef

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2012, 09:56:41 PM »
It's not as easy to find as I thought.  I found something 6 or 7 weeks ago but can't seem to find it again, so I can't vouch for the accuracy of the source.
The start and finish boxes are side-by-side, 3m long and 1.5m wide.  The shared border is the center line of the figure 8, the first cone being 3m away from the start/finish boxes, and the next one 12m from the first.  I'm reasonably certain of the start/finish and 3m gap, but I've seen recommendations for a practice layout of 20m apart for the main cones.  I think that's pretty big, but maybe it's right.
I used the 12m for practice before the first (and only, so far!) event I competed in.  Either would work for a practice, but of course if you want to compare times to judge your level against others, you'll want to know for sure.
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Brakelate

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2012, 11:53:23 PM »
Exactly.  I was looking for the "universal standard" measurements so that any times obtained can be compared fairly.

I too thought I saw a thread or perhaps a video somewhere that showed the entire thing laid out in great detail and now cannot seem to remember where it was.


How many "laps" is the standard?   

And, to be clear, the start, and more importantly the finish needs to end at a stand still in the box, correct?   Not a Auto-X type of event where you can blast out the exit gate at speed .  You are disqualified if you over shoot the "finish" box?
'09 Suzuki DRZ-400SM   '02 Kawasaki ZRX1200R

ironslede68

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2012, 02:06:07 AM »
almost 40 feet between the main cones. 12 meters.
A timid person is frightened before a danger; a coward during the time; and a courageous person afterward. -- Jean Paul Richter

Motogymkhanaman

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2012, 02:21:35 AM »
GP8 details as follows.


Brakelate

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2012, 04:57:07 AM »
Excellent Info Sir!    I shall get to work on it as soon as possible.

The DRZ is down for suspension replacement, so perhaps I shall go try it on the ZRX for now just to get a feel for it. 
'09 Suzuki DRZ-400SM   '02 Kawasaki ZRX1200R

KrisCook

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 04:24:01 PM »
Hey by the way, Brakelate, welcome!!   I've been lurking and have forgotten my manners.  I ride (poorly) with the hooligans from Birmingham, Alabama.  We'll crank up next month and have our next gymkhana, and I'm already excited about it.  Glad to have you!
"I plan to keep this one long enough to determine the approximate plum-wore-out coefficient."  -- KD Trull

BillZ

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2012, 07:27:52 AM »
I've been riding this GP8 pattern almost exclusively.  I did lay out a simple variation that someone else posted here but have switched back to the GP8 for practicing, using the standard measures.  This is tough stuff.
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Motogymkhanaman

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2012, 06:08:36 AM »
Did a comparison of the two steering styles that can be used for GP8, Conventional versus Full-Lock. Although the machines and riders are of equivalent capability, you can see that the full-lock method leads to much quicker times, but it's much more difficult to master.


 

ironslede68

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2012, 08:41:31 AM »
hard to argue with a ten second gap. thanks for posting that up
A timid person is frightened before a danger; a coward during the time; and a courageous person afterward. -- Jean Paul Richter

BillZ

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2012, 09:20:30 AM »
Did a comparison of the two steering styles that can be used for GP8, Conventional versus Full-Lock. Although the machines and riders are of equivalent capability, you can see that the full-lock method leads to much quicker times, but it's much more difficult to master.

http://youtu.be/9MA83fjpW98


I'd be interested in hearing more about the two types of steering styles, unless it'll be in your book, in which case, I'll wait. 
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Motogymkhanaman

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2012, 11:21:29 AM »
For most of us and for most of the time we are never troubled by having to steer the bike with the bars at full lock. The only time we probably do is when we are pulling the bike away from its parking spot and only then for a very short time indeed. In fact, most of us only begin to feel happy on the bike when we are going fast enough to only have to make minimal movements of the bars. Big bar movements tend to give most of us a fit of the vapors so we have become conditioned over time to be at our happiest with small bar movements.

In Moto Gymkhana we really have to be able to turn the bike in as small a radius as possible which means having the steering up against the lock stops. Of all the riding modes, this is perhaps the most difficult to master as with the bars locked over you have completeley removed your ability to steer the bike by conventional means.

This loss of our primary steering control does not mean we have lost control of our steering as the bike can be steered reasonably well with the bars hard over by a couple of other methods such as weight-shift (not very good) and throttle/brake combination (excellent). Although these alternative steering methods are perfectly valid, convincing ourseleves that they are is really difficult to do and requires lots and lots of practice before your brain accepts the validity of these alternative methods. It is a little bit like the way you learnt to steer a bike in the first place when you wobbled off down the path on your very first push bike. If you started out on a tricycle then you quickly found out that you had to steer left to go left. You were perfectly happy with this until you changed to a two wheeler when you pretty soon found out that steer left go left no longer worked and you had to re-program your brain to accept the new regime of steer left go right. This revised steering method has become hard wired into your brain after all these years and so it will take an awful lot to implant another method that you would be equally happy to use.

There are two reliable methods of re-wiring your brain to accept the new regime which are the 'duck-walk' method and the 'kiss the stops' method.

In the duck walk, we sit on the bike with the engine running, in gear with the clutch in. Lock the bars over fully and slowly and with lots of clutch walk the bike around until it's facing in the opposite direction and stop. Repeat in the other direction, once again coming to a stop when you have gone through 180 degrees. Repeat again only this time take longer steps, but make sure that the bars do not come off the stops as you are doing so. Do this over and over again taking longer and longer steps until you reach the point when you have made a 180 without your feet actually touching the ground. After lots and lots of practice you will eventually be able to make a complete 360 without your feet touching the ground! Problem with this method is the over reliance on the use of the clutch, so you then have to learn how to use throttle brake combinations to control the driving force. This all takes a lot of time so it might be better to use the kiss the stops method instead.

In kiss the stops the failure mode i.e the bars coming off the stops, is an important part of the success mode which makes learning the technique much less stressful.

Start by simply riding round in a circle on a steady throttle at such a pace that you feel that the bike is not going to fall over whilst ensuring your nose is pointing the way you want to go. Once you are happy and reasonably relaxed, apply a little rear brake whilst at the same time leaning slightly out of the turn. You will notice that the bars want to turn more in the direction that you are turning. Release the brake and feel the bars come back to their neutral position. Repeat only this time apply a little more back brake and you will notice that the bars turn a bit quicker and a bit further than they did before, release the brake and feel the bars return to the neutral position.  After a bit of experimentation you will find a certain combination of speed and back brake will bring the bars almost fully round. It is at this point that you have to commit yourself to helping the bars go that last tiny bit in the sure and certain knowledge that the instant they do hit (kiss the stop) you will release a little of the rear brake and recover into conventional steering mode again.

Repeat the exercise and try to kiss the stops several times in each circulation. You will find that you will soon get the hang of kiss-recover-kiss-recover until you are happy to make the kisses slightly longer and the recovery phase slightly shorter. Eventually you will find that you can make a complete circle with the bars at full lock whilst managing the steering by making adjustments to the amount of brake applied.

Try both methods to see how you get on as once you have mastered steering at full lock, you will never again baulk at U turning out of a narrow space and it will do your Moto Gymkhana attack times a lot of good as well.


     

BillZ

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2012, 07:05:03 AM »
This is excellent stuff.  I'm going out to try this today.  Thanx for the lesson!
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Oleg Gorbachev

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Re: G8 Standard Course layout (Official Measurements) ?
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2012, 08:12:44 AM »
To help your bar to turn full lock you can add little bit and in short time the front brake. Use with coution and alot of training needed.
I just start to mustering of using front brake few days ago.