Author Topic: Riding position  (Read 23400 times)

norton73

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2012, 10:09:49 PM »
OK, I'm by no means a decent Gymkhana rider, nor a great trials rider. However I have done some trials riding, mostly vintage, but I do have some modern bike experience.
Take what I post here as something to think about. Trials riders also use the concept of the rear wheel is more important than the front also. The rear drives the bike, so a rider thinks about it more. A front almost always goes wider in a turn than the rear, so a rider will put the front over a rock or an obstical to keep the rear tracking where it will do the most good.
Another important concept that I've observed in trials and most other sports, skiing, mtn bike riding, whitewater kayaking, etc, is staying centered. Lean the bike, but keep your body between the wheels. Look at Mark, he is rotated at the waist to keep his torso between the wheels contact patch.
Just something to help the thinking process.

Ultrags

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2012, 08:36:21 PM »
I would ride a unicycle about a mile one way to middle school & back home in the mid 70's. I think I will try to incorporate a little of that mindset. 
I very seriously doubt I cut the seat on either bike to keep me pushed back though.

ironslede68

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2012, 06:57:12 AM »
i would think that the best riding position would be the one your most comfortable with and don't try to move around any more than you would have to to control the bike. in other words. the lest wasted movement the better. turn the wheel and you head. most of the other is advanced technic so get the basics mastered first.


crawl, walk, run
A timid person is frightened before a danger; a coward during the time; and a courageous person afterward. -- Jean Paul Richter

Motogymkhanaman

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2012, 10:56:53 AM »
Body position is all to do with understanding the position of the Combined Centre of Gravity CCoG of both you and the machine. Knowing where it is now and where it will be after you have made whatever control input you are just about to do is critical. Moving the CCoG the right amount at the right time will help to keep the bike stable.

Remember that your head is a very heavy weight stuck on the end of a long lever arm and so its movement has the greatest effect on the CCoG. Therefore, it is really head position and not just body position that will make the most difference.

Brakelate

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #19 on: August 16, 2012, 01:19:01 PM »
I don't know.  Do what works.  I ride a supermoto and mix knee out and foot out based on the corner diameter, etc.

But, the most disturbing thing, is that the guy in the second shot doesn't have his helmet strap on.

'09 Suzuki DRZ-400SM   '02 Kawasaki ZRX1200R

buzz

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2012, 07:54:40 AM »
My mother said the same thing. ;)

Brakelate

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2012, 05:02:32 AM »
 ???

Are you jabbing me about the helmet strap comment? 




 :o
'09 Suzuki DRZ-400SM   '02 Kawasaki ZRX1200R

buzz

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2012, 09:38:34 AM »
Yes..............

But she really did say the same thing. ;D

BillZ

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #23 on: August 21, 2012, 07:36:16 AM »
Ain't a helmet without the strap, just a lid.  Just kiddin' you.  We're all adults making our own choices here.  (Where's my knee pads?...)
Lean into it...

rayian

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2013, 05:41:01 PM »

I am just finishing writing a book on Moto Gymkhana Riding Techniques which will go into some depth on this very subject. A near to final draft is going over to Japan in a few days time so that they can sign off everything in it and once that is done, then it will initially be available as an e-book with a printed version being available thereafter.     

I'm just wondering if that book is out yet or what's happening with it.

Motogymkhanaman

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2013, 04:01:07 AM »
The book is being replaced with a series of exercise cards. Shouldn't be long now!

BillZ

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2014, 07:35:16 PM »
Exercise Cards: want, want, want.  (I need all the help I can get.)
Lean into it...

KrisCook

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2014, 03:15:08 PM »
Exercise Cards: want, want, want.  (I need all the help I can get.)

Me too!  How will it be sold?  You'll let us know when we can buy a copy, right? 
"I plan to keep this one long enough to determine the approximate plum-wore-out coefficient."  -- KD Trull

sane

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2016, 05:58:05 PM »
First time post I think.

 I wanted to comment on the Rear Steering technique. The front wheel initiates the turn. The rear wheel (because of the ideal 40/60 distribution in weight, front to back) controls and completes the turn.

By shifting the weight back and leaning into your turn. The rider's weight is shifting back as the bike slows, thus tightening the turn, using the rear as a pivot point.

KrisCook

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Re: Riding position
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2016, 11:14:46 AM »


I'm still scared of full lock.   :'(
"I plan to keep this one long enough to determine the approximate plum-wore-out coefficient."  -- KD Trull