Author Topic: Help: How to increase speed and lean angle in practice?  (Read 12434 times)

Lnewqban

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Re: Help: How to increase speed and lean angle in practice?
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2013, 08:35:01 AM »
this vid worked out great for me except one thing. unless i crank up miss piggy's idle i cant take my hands off. that big v-twin lurches at low speed and makes it feel like your chopping the throttle.

Take a look at this:
http://amgrass.com/forum/practice-practice-practice/post-your-gp8-times/msg912/#msg912
Never ride faster than your guardian angel can fly.

GymkhanaDog

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Re: Help: How to increase speed and lean angle in practice?
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2013, 12:30:44 PM »
this vid worked out great for me except one thing. unless i crank up miss piggy's idle i cant take my hands off. that big v-twin lurches at low speed and makes it feel like your chopping the throttle.

Take a look at this:
http://amgrass.com/forum/practice-practice-practice/post-your-gp8-times/msg912/#msg912


What do you ride? Sorry if it's been answered before, I didn't see it.

I ride an SV650N these days and found that second gear really helped me get used to how the engine behaves at near-idle because it smooths out that lumpiness. Not to mention that the SV pulls like a tractor right off of idle, even in second gear. I haven't adjusted the TPS yet like I should - heck, maybe I'll do that today.

Once I got (am getting) more comfortable with second gear pulls, I went back down to first and found that I was far more confident with the bit of lumpiness at or very near idle. I've also been pushing myself to keep it off of idle if I can when performing 180's, dragging the rear brake some while keeping the throttle cracked slightly. Yeah, it leads to a hot rear brake, especially if you're out practicing for two or three hours, but I think Sintered pads may help with that some.

Admittedly I've not tried taking my hands off of the bars yet; old teachings and old habits die hard; Keep your feet on the pegs and your hands on the bars. :D

xpertsnowcarver

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Re: Help: How to increase speed and lean angle in practice?
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2013, 07:57:47 PM »
..............Video - It appears as though the gsxr in the video has a greater lock to lock steering range and maybe a different sprocket. In comparison to my friend's gsxr, once we reached the point of steering lock, there's no way to turn the handle bars further to pull out, causing us to throw our foot down or bump the throttle. (You can see in the video the rider leans in further, which would cause the steering to turn in further, pulling the bike out. Therefore the rider does not have the bike at full lock.) When we tried increasing speed or idling in 2nd, we reached the lean angle but the radius was wider. But, clearly the rider isn't bumping the throttle to keep the bike from dropping, proving that the rider is not at full lock. The steering is free to turn out to increase lean or turn in to decrease lean.

Joel,

It can be at full lock and still be able to counter-steer using body weight to make the bike lean more and to stop the rotation.
The thing is that, due to the geometry of the steering, the more you lean the bike at full lock, the smaller the radius of turn becomes.

Check this out:
http://amgrass.com/forum/video-pics/tire-arc-deviation-disscussion/msg430/#msg430

If speed remains the same and radius get smaller, the greater centripetal acceleration rolls the bike out of lean and the bike returns to a more or less stand up position and straight trajectory.


I'm going to have to agree with you now that I've practiced this more and more. (I didn't want to reply until I tried it myself!) You're absolutely right. I leaned her further and noticed a significant reduction in radius. I had to trust my front tire not to slip!